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The Ruby Group | Akron and Columbus, OH
Every profession has its own lineup of myths that need busting. Those who have spent the majority of their career in a sales role have heard them all. The fact is that sales is an exciting, sometimes grueling and often rewarding profession. We're the frontline of an organization and vital to its growth. However, like it or not, many myths exist about who the "ideal" salesperson is and what a career in sales is like. The following four myths are among some of the most popular assumptions about the sales profession. Can you think of any other myths that need busting? Myth #1: Salespeople need to be extroverts.Reality: Contrary to popular belief, introverts excel at selling, too. While it's not always the case introverts tend to be better listeners, more understanding and more focused on others. Sandler believe that sales professionals can be trained to overcome their inherent introverted tendencies through reinforcing behaviors, attitudes and techniques. Myth #2: The gift of gab is all you need to be good at sales.Reality: The phrase "telling is not selling" is a classic among the Sandler community. That's because successful salespeople know that the prospect should be doing at least 80% of the talking, while the salesperson fills in the remaining 20% with questions, restating what they're hearing and finding their way to prospects pain. Myth #3: If you do a good job, referrals come to you.Reality: While word-of-mouth referrals leave you feeling warm and fuzzy, they often are few and far between and can't be counted on for a steady flow of business. When asking for referrals the key is to explain how you work with clients and describe your ideal prospect. Otherwise, it's hard for your referral source to envision someone who could be right for you. All in all, you've done a good job and earned the right to ask for referrals. Asking for referrals is an essential part of growing your business and it's your responsibility to take the opportunity to ask. Myth #4: Selling is a one-person job.Reality: Sandler believes that selling is a team activity. A smart salesperson relies on several people throughout the sales process. Whether you're working with marketing on a sales piece, bouncing a tactic of a peer, seeking counsel from a sales manager or consulting with a trainer, selling is far from a one-person job.
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